Killing


 

 

Director Shinya Tsukamoto

Country Japan

Genre Drama, Sword action

Duration 80min.

Language Japanese

Subtitles Italiano

The film starts from the germinal questions by Shin’ya Tsukamoto.

“A young ronin who stares at his sword with ardor.
This was the germ of an idea that I’d first had years ago.
How will I kill another person with this sword? How can I?
Some samurai must have thought that.”

After about 250 years of peace in Japan, samurai warriors in the mid-19th century were impoverished. Consequently, many left their masters to become wandering ronin. Mokunoshin Tsuzuki is one such samurai. To maintain his swordsmanship skills, Mokunoshin spars daily with Ichisuke, a farmer’s son. While farm life is peaceful, there is monumental turmoil in Japan. This in turn causes civil unrest. Jirozaemon Sawamura, a mild-mannered yet skillful ronin, stays in the village to look for other potential warriors when a group of outlaw ronin arrives. When the hot-blooded Ichisuke takes on the outlaws, the direction of their lives drastically changes.

Shyn’ya Tsukamoto

Born in Tokyo, Japan on January 1, 1960. He started making films when he was a junior high school student. He graduated from Nippon University, majoring in oil painting. After graduating the university, he was employed by a TV commercial film production. While working for the production, he participated in stage activity along with the people who became both the cast members and film crewfor his film, Tetsuo The Iron Man (’89). The film instantly put him in limelight as a filmmaker with an original vision and style in the international film scene. The films that followed Tetsuo received many rave reviews and prizes: Tetsuo II The Body Hammer (’92), Tokyo Fist (’95), Bullet Ballet (’98).He won the Jury’s Prize (Contro Corrente section), A Snake of June (’02) at the 59th Venice International Film Festival and the New Visions Award for Vital (’04) at the 37th Sitges –International Fantastic Film Festival of Catalonia and Orizzonti Prize for Kotoko (’11) at the 68th Venice International Film Festival. In 2014, Fires on the Plain(’14) was selected in the competition at the 71st Venice International Film Festival. He is also an ardent actor and has acted for many directors. He received the Best Leading Actor as well as the Best Director at the Mainichi Newspaper Film Concoursin 2015 for Fires on the Plain. He also plays Mokichi, an impoverished villager/martyr, in Martin Scorsese’s Silence (’16)